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Trainees receiving certificates for completing the vocational training funded by Islamic Relief Waqf

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Women learn to make garments such as dresses, coats and school uniform in the professionally-taught sewing cours

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Over the ten day cooking course, participants learned about food hygiene as well as how to make popular dishes.

Jordan is currently home to over 1.3 million refugees who have fled conflict in neighbouring Syria. Many have been in the country for years, unable to return home and becoming increasingly vulnerable as any savings they have to dwindle away and restrictions on their ability to work and rising accommodation costs drive them ever deeper into poverty. As the pressure on Jordan’s public services continues, some 80 per cent of Syrians are living in host communities and below the poverty line.

Female refugees are particularly vulnerable in a country in which gender inequality remains a challenge: girls may be subject to early marriage and less access to education, whilst lone women often depend on charitable assistance to get by Islamic Relief Waqf funding this year meant Islamic Relief could give some of the most vulnerable women the skills they need to achieve financial independence, so they can improve their quality of life. The project worked with women in Al-Mahatta, in the country’s capital city. Home to refugees from various nationalities, resources in the neighbourhood are especially limited, unemployment is rife and school attendance at rock bottom – fuelling community tension and violence.

Delivered by our implementing partner The Jordan Hashemite Charity Organization, the project supported 60 vulnerable Syrian and Jordanian women to develop the skills to run their own business or to secure a job. As well as free vocational training in either cooking or sewing, every woman received training in communications skills, small business management, and marketing – as well as the equipment they need to boost their earning potential.

“The training brought us together”

Sanaa, 40, lives with her husband and children in Amman, Jordan. Already running a small enterprise cooking at home, the Islamic Relief Waqf project was an invaluable opportunity for
entrepreneurial Sanaa. Taking part in the cookery course, Sanaa discovered new cooking techniques and how to maximise her productivity and market her business effectively. “The cooking course helped me to improve and develop my cooking skills, and the cooking kit I have received will support me in my food processing home-business,” she said, describing the big
plans she is cooking up for her tasty enterprise. “Now, I have a big opportunity to continue with my cooking project and increase my family income.”

“Through the training, I had the chance to explore new food culture and techniques from Syrian refugees, as it brought us together.”

The difference between IWF and other organisations is that IWF will invest your donations and bring a sustainable return year on year and serve people indefinitely.

Find out more about International WAQF funds. If you may need any help Get in touch PLEASE!

International Waqf Fund. Infinite Good.

MORE PHOTOS

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Trainees receiving certificates for completing the vocational training funded by Islamic Relief Waqf

MORE PHOTOS

15 More

Women learn to make garments such as dresses, coats and school uniform in the professionally-taught sewing cours

MORE PHOTOS

15 More

Over the ten day cooking course, participants learned about food hygiene as well as how to make popular dishes.